Robots

  • A candidate in the French presidential election believes that a 'digital revolution' will eventually lead to a work-free future. Socialist nominee Benoit Hamon has proposed that France adopt a universal basic income - a state handout of €750 a month - which is made to everyone in preparation for the impending 'digital revolution'.

  • Japan will be relying on robots to teach English to children. In fact, the Japanese government has decided to turn to technologies to try to interest students in foreign languages ​​in an archipelago not so polyglot.

  • Japanese automakers have looked beyond the industry trend to develop self-driving cars and instead are focusing their attentions on developing robots in an effort to keep Japan's elderly population on the move. The country's population is ageing faster than the rest of the world and its birthrate continues to decrease. Toyota Motor Corp has recognized the potential in becoming a mass producer of robots in order to alleviate and help Japan's elderly citizens.

  • German automotive company Continental is to exhibit their Continental Urban Mobility Experience (CUbE) driverless vehicle at the Consumer Electronic Show in Las Vegas this week, and introduce their long term plan for developing smart city transportation infrastructure.

  • The New South Wales government is well aware of the importance of technology today and in the future. That is why, it announced that it will invest $23 million in a new program named STEMShare Community that provides every public school with access to emerging technology, thus adding value to the state’s syllabus and the ICT general capability for the Australian curriculum.

  • Japan's SoftBank and Huawei's Wireless X Labs recently signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) regarding connected robots. SoftBank plans to offer Cube and Kibako (automated cube robots), while Huawei provides 5G wireless networks. Joint efforts will be conducted to implement 5G-based smart service robots by 2018.