Networks

  • AT&T and Nokia are teaming up to provide virtually seamless Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity around the world. The companies are using Nokia's Worldwide IoT Network Grid (WING) to offer AT&T's enterprise customers the benefits of Nokia's global IoT ecosystem. These include core network, dedicated IoT operations, billing, security, data analytics, and more.

  • The Californian cities of Berkeley and Palm Springs have announced that it will take its first steps towards implementing its 'smart city' infrastructures after reaching an agreement with 5 Bars Communities, which is a dba of XG Communities.

  • China has been projected to lead the global adoption of 5G technology by 2023, according to research compiled by CCS Insight. CCS Insight have claimed that the country's booming market will ensure and facilitate that 5G is quicker out of the starting blocks than any other previous mobile technology.

  • ICT experts have claimed that increased investment is a 'necessity' if Africa wants to benefit from the forthcoming 5G revolution. Globally, the sector is currently advancing its networks in an attempt to deploy 5G early. However, one prominent ICT expert has recommended greater investment in 4G-LTE for the Africa continent.

  • Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Ajit Pai, has outlined the blueprint which he believes will help accelerate the development and subsequent deployment of 5G networks in the US.

  • Bahrain's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, along with Batelco and Avaya, has transformed the ministry's communications and collaboration capabilities, with a strategic ICT implementation to connect all ministry employees around the world. The ministry worked closely with Avaya to transform its citizen services by integrating and digitalizing its communications and collaboration capabilities through a two-phased project.

  • US technology behemoth Google has announced that it will spend $13bn in expanding its US data centre network.

  • The human need to communicate is constant. From the earliest gestures, symbols, first language and writing, to today's digital torrents, people have always felt the need to connect, share, and reach out to each other. Huawei's vision is to build a Better Connected World, to enrich lives through communications.

    36,000 years ago, in the Chauvet Cave in France, Palaeolithic humans used hematite and charcoal to draw images of animals, and record the spectacle of a volcanic eruption. Today, we select emojis to compose and communicate our emotions. The technology may change, but not even the profoundest gulfs of time can alter the impulse to connect.

    Connection can be a spoken exchange; it can be the transmission of knowledge; or the spread of culture. In the past, the urge to record and communicate drove us to painstakingly hew wooden tablets, or use the skins of wild beasts to make parchment. Now, art students from remote corners of the world can travel by video to the banks of the Seine, take a virtual tour of the Louvre, and hear lecturers expounding on the mysterious smile of the Mona Lisa.

    Connection is an expression of love. Years ago, youths from the village over the hill would write long letters avowing their love for girls they had only glimpsed a few times. And how many of those letters actually made it into the hands of the intended recipients? Today, our loved ones are only a video call away, and we do not have to miss a moment with them. Over a video connection, smiles still draw an instinctive smile in reply, and tears can be shared.

    Connection is a way to work better, together. In the past, the fastest pony express would still take days to arrive. For the most part, we had to solve our own problems. Today, a Silicon Valley scientist can consult seamlessly with a research team in Dubai and a customer in KSA. All it takes is a broadband connection.

    Connection is an exploration beyond the boundaries of physics and physiology. Little more than 100 years ago, the world was stunned when the first telephone call ended the tyranny of geography. Today, astronauts speak to mission command from the reaches of space.

    Huawei believes that connection makes for a better world. Our sons and daughters may travel far from home, but connection transmits their love and care back to the parents to whom they owe so much. Students have always buried themselves in textbooks, but connection opens up new worlds for them to learn. Our sweetheart may not be by our side, but connection can carry love across the miles and down the years.

    In the future, a Better Connected World will bring us a different kind of experience. It will revolutionize every part of our lives, our economy, our communities.

    India, 2042. Sanjay, nine years old, suffers from a rare PNET cancer. The tumor has hemorrhaged, and must be removed now if he is to survive. But in his home town, there is no surgeon qualified to perform the operation. The hospital log on to a global AI medical network, and finds a brain specialist in London who is ready to perform remote surgery.

    High-definition video cameras and MRI equipment capture every detail of Sanjay's condition, and transmit it in real time to the London hospital. The surgeon takes control of a multipurpose computer-assisted surgical robot, and begins the operation - the network reproducing every sensation 100%, so that her fingers feel just as if she were right there in the operating theater.

    The operation is a success. For young Sanjay, this is much more important than the technology and governance that allowed it to happen. In fact, the UN resolution to pool global medical resources was passed before he was born. But it has already saved countless lives in underdeveloped areas.

    China, 2035.Liu Wei climbs into his new driverless vehicle. The car has no indicator lights at the front or back - but of course, the roads are fully automated now, so who needs indicators? Liu tells the car where he wants to go, and the onboard navigation system connects to city transport control, to check for traffic jams. The roads are clear, and the computer displays a precise estimated time of arrival. On the way, Liu schedules his next few days of work, with music on in the background. Every second of the journey, his car is making digital "handshakes" with hundreds of other vehicles, learning their speed, route, whether they are about to change lane. This is how the roads have been made safe: today there are almost no injuries or deaths from traffic accidents.

    The central transport network is constantly collecting data from tens of thousands of cars on the road, analyzing traffic flows, and delivering optimum route advice. In fact, this data is now being used to help plan where new roads should be built. As a result, even for residents of Liu's packed city, "I was stuck in traffic" is no longer an excuse.

    USA, 2028. Every second of the day, internet users all over the world upload millions of video footage. John is developing a new search engine that will recognize and understand the people, objects, and situations in those videos. An AI engine with machine learning capabilities is reaching out to data centers all over the world, collecting the archives of HD video that they contain. John is confident that the new engine will help users find the exact video clips that they want. More important, though, will be its analytic capabilities. It will tell fashion designers what colors and cuts young people are favoring. It will show toy makers the latest games. And it will help governments understand what their citizens think of the latest public projects.

    In the future, we believe that connectivity will be as ubiquitous as the air that we breathe. Connections between people, person to device, and thing-to-thing, will feed into real-time intelligent analysis and communications. They will help satisfy our every economic need. Using these connections will feel as natural to us as breathing. In fact, we will barely be aware that they exist. Our focus will naturally lie on the applications and services that connectivity enables.

    From the deep past of Chauvet, to real-time video links; from messages that echo down the millennia to data that flashes across continents, technology is enabling connection and satisfying a basic human need. Welcome to the Better Connected World.

  • As technology suppliers develop the next-generation of wireless technologies, mobile operators invest in the networks of the future, and governments launch innovation programs, the early benefits of 5G will go to economies where globally aligned 5G spectrum and technology innovation is readily available.

  • Finnish telecommunications powerhouse Nokia has expressed his frustrations with its connected car project in Europe. The head of Nokia's V2X program, Uwe Puetzschler, has warned that Europe 'is not as happy as it should be' and derided the poor quality of networks available to them in their bid to advance the connected car sector.

  • US chip firm Qualcomm has announced that it has released a chipset which has been specifically designed based on 3GPP cellular standards for the 'connected cars'. In a statement issued to the press, Qualcomm introduced the 9150 Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything (C-V2X) chipset which combines LTE network connectivity with direct communications in the internationally harmonized 5.9GHz band.

  • The decision to turn off 2G in Singapore later this year is set to have devastating consequences for thousands of people who still use the city state’s second generation.

    Singapore authorities have opted to pull the plug on 2G mobile phone networks in April this year. However, cash strapped migrant workers and technophobic pensioners are set to be cut off after failing to embrace the technology revolution in the city - instead opting for 2G network cheap and robust handsets as opposed to smartphones.

  • South Korea, one of the prominent countries leading the charge towards the commercialization of 5G networks has conducted one of the world's first ever 5G auctions.

  • LinkedIn, the world's largest professional network has confirmed that the UAE is the most connected country in the world. The information released by LinkedIn accurately reflects the innovative and dynamic nature of the UAE.  The professional networking decides to publicly disclose the figures after it emerged that it had reached a milestone of 500 million members across 200 countries. The professional networking site has 22 million members in the MENA region alone.

  • The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has completed its first 5G auction, with a sale of 28GHz spectrum licensing which raised a cool $702 million.

  • A comprehensive study released by CTIA, a US-based industry association of wireless carriers - has claimed that China remains ahead of South Korea in the race to develop and subsequently deploy 5G networks.

  • Telecommunications operator Vodafone New Zealand has announced that it has conducted pre-standard 5G trials in partnership with Nokia in an effort to demonstrate how it can evolve its networks from 4G to 5G.

  • Indianapolis has been named as the most 'connected city' in the United States. The state is recognized as a continued leader identified when it comes to embracing technology and innovation in order to bridge the 'digital divide'.

  • The first commercial 5G network was launched in portions of Sacramento, as well as Houston, Indianapolis, and Los Angeles. Built on the Verizon-led open 5G TF network standard, Verizon 5G Home is the next generation of home broadband internet service that provides super-fast Wi-Fi.